Book Description

History Of The Hour: Clocks And Modern Temporal Orders - From Library Journal Today it is impossible to think of a life unregulated by clocks or a day structured other than in 24 60-minute hours. In the Middle Ages it was different, however, and changing. Historian Dohrn-van Rossum (Univ. of Bielefeld, Germany) examines in detail the technical developments that time-keeping mechanisms were undergoing, principally between 1300 and 1600, and the subtle interactions of these developments with European culture (political, religious, economic, and scientific). Some previous theories are debunked. Readable and thoroughly researched, this is required for history of science collections.?Michael D. Cramer, Virginia Polytechnic & State Univ. Libs., BlacksburgCopyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. Read more From Scientific American Dohrn-van Rossum, who teaches medieval and early modern history at the University of Bielefeld in Germany, has researched his subject so profoundly that he can append to this book 81 pages of notes-mostly bibliographical-running to 948 entries. He treats the subject profoundly, too, dealing not only with the history of timekeeping devices from the sundial to the cesium clock but also with changes in the human conception of time from the cyclical order of 'Church's time' to the linear order of 'merchant's time.' The prose sometimes plods, and key points are not always crisply stated, but the story of timekeeping is here in wonderful depth. Read more See all Editorial Reviews

Download or read online HISTORY OF THE HOUR: CLOCKS AND MODERN TEMPORAL ORDERS

History of the Hour: Clocks and Modern Temporal Orders